Gloworm X1 review

A recent ride back from the pub a strategy meeting recently highlighted that my current AyUp lights are now indeed 5 years old, when the battery ran out after 5 minutes. Lighting has progressed quite a way since I did the research for my first set of decent off-road lights and light output and run times are now significantly higher. The top end lights still cost the same, you just get enough light to turn night into day, and the next price bracket down gives you more than enough light (and more than my AyUps) for around half the cost.

Upgrade or replace

I considered getting the AyUp LED’s and batteries updated as AyUp did and third parties do provide an upgrade service. I would have used the AyUp service to refresh them to something more powerful but it seems they no longer do this for UK customers and I don’t have the time to send them away. As the bar light has a 6hr run time, I guessed this might last for 2 hour long Mayhem lights so I decided a new helmet light would be perfect for my immediate needs.

After much research and contemplation I decided on the Gloworm X1, a pretty easy decision really as it ticked all the boxes – Lightweight – A lot of light – A decent run time – Well priced Gloworm are a New Zealand company but have a UK distributor so after a few days of pondering I put in an order. I decided on a spare battery and a bar mount while I was at it and applied my Singletrack Premier discount code and sat back and waited. 3 days later nothing, no lights, no emails, not a sign of anything. I dropped CRGMoto (the UK distributor) an email and left a voice message. A week after ordering, still nothing, and I was starting to get concerned. More messages and I finally got an email saying that they were due to ship the day after having waited for a new batch of bar mounts before shipping my complete order. So, customer communication could be improved but sure enough they arrived the next day. Since I got my lights CRGMoto are no longer the UK distributor after failing to fulfil orders and have been elusive in being contactable.

First impressions are good. The box is small and light so the light must be as well.

The light looks lovely, a CNC’d block of Aluminium on a minimalist bracket with a pair of cables coming out of the back. The light is held onto the stand by a single hex bolt (allen key provided) with rubber washers to allow it to be tight but still tweaked once secure. The bracket has slots in the base to allow it to be attached to a helmet and plenty of velcro straps are provided for this purpose. One cable provides power via one that has a weatherproof connector that attaches to the battery, the other has a sealed switch on the end, backed with velcro. This is used to turn in on/off and control the various settings that the light supports. It’s a good solution as the button can be located on the side of the helmet onto a velcro pad allowing easier access to the functions compared to reaching for the light itself. An extension cable means the battery can be located in a backpack if desired.

Attaching the light to a helmet is fiddly but not too difficult. finding an appropriate vent and routing the velcro strap takes a bit of time but it’s easy to secure and find suitable positions for the light, battery and switch.

In use the light lives up to expectations, the switch allows 4 different output levels that are easy to cycle through and I did find myself turning the output down on sections of trail that didn’t need it as it’s easy to do.

Conclusions

These lights do well in groups tests and it’s easy to see why. They are well made with good light levels and easy to use. You can program them if you want and are physically light.

I’m considering buying one it’s bigger brothers to replace the bar light but the uncertainty over distribution is making me look elsewhere. If this is sorted before I decide to buy then it sums up what I think of them nicely – by over £200.

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